CSN Weekly Meeting – Re-Engineering Yourself

Do you know how to re-engineer yourself for your next great career transition? Join us to discover ideas how to.

Join us at Career Support Network to learn how.

Career Support Network meets from Noon to 2:00 p.m. on Wednesdays @ Maple Springs United Methodist Church, 2569 Reynolda Rd, Winston-Salem NC. (map)

The topic on 7/22/2015 will be – Re-Engineering Yourself
 Re-engineering yourself
Re-Engineering yourself is how you take your prior experiences, current skills and potentially new skills and move into a new career. This re-engineering could move you into a different position and potentially into a completely new industry. Re-engineering can occur with a little work or possibly with lots of work, practice, training and/or education. Re-engineering may be the only answer if your prior/current position is related to an outdated business practice or industry. Join us at CSN to discuss ideas regarding Re-Engineering
For information call (336) 283-6121 or email NCWiseman@TeddyBurriss.com

Here is a link to some useful Career Transition Books.

Do you know of other books that have helped you in your career transition?

CSN Weekly Meeting – Information/Support Resources Available in Career Transition

Do you know all of the resources available to you during career transition?

Join us at Career Support Network to learn how.

Career Support Network meets from Noon to 2:00 p.m. on Wednesdays @ Maple Springs United Methodist Church, 2569 Reynolda Rd, Winston-Salem NC. (map)

The topic on 7/15/2015 will be – Information/Support Resources Available in Career Transition
 jobsarticle-resources
There is a plethora of resources available to folks in career transition. The challenge is knowing what these resources are and how to find them. We will share ideas and hear new ideas about various career transition resources available to us, where they are and how to benefit from them. Join us at CSN to share your ideas and learn from others.
For information call (336) 283-6121 or email NCWiseman@TeddyBurriss.com

Here is a link to some useful Career Transition Books.

Do you know of other books that have helped you in your career transition?

CSN Weekly Meeting – Dealing with Age Discrimination

Are you unsure of how to deal with Age Discrimination during career transition?

Join us at Career Support Network to learn how.

Career Support Network meets from Noon to 2:00 p.m. on Wednesdays @ Maple Springs United Methodist Church, 2569 Reynolda Rd, Winston-Salem NC. (map)

The topic on 7/8/2015 will be – Dealing with Age Discrimination
Age Discrimination
Discrimination will not go away. We have to know how to detect discrimination and how to deal with it. During this CSN session we will share our own experiences and how we deal with different types of discrimination during career transition. Join us and share your ideas and insights.

For information call (336) 283-6121 or email NCWiseman@TeddyBurriss.com

Here is a link to some useful Career Transition Books.

Do you know of other books that have helped you in your career transition?

CSN Weekly Meeting – Managing the Career Transition Process

Do you have a Career Transition Plan?

Join us at Career Support Network to learn more.

Career Support Network meets from Noon to 2:00 p.m. on Wednesdays @ Maple Springs United Methodist Church, 2569 Reynolda Rd, Winston-Salem NC. (maps)

The topic on 7/1/2015 will be – Managing the Career Transition Process

Action Plan

 

Career Transition, like any other activity, needs to be done based on a plan. We’ll talk about how to plan your goals and your process so that you create the greatest results during your career transition.We will discuss tasks, measurement, priorities and the stuff you should not have in your Career Transition Plan. Join us at CSN to learn as well as to share your ideas.

For information call (336) 283-6121 or email NCWiseman@TeddyBurriss.com

Here is a link to some useful Career Transition Books.

Do you know of other books that have helped you in your career transition?

CSN Weekly Meeting – Using LinkedIn During Career Transition

Have you figured out how to use LinkedIn during your career transition?

Join us at Career Support Network to learn how.

Career Support Network meets from Noon to 2:00 p.m. on Wednesdays @ Maple Springs United Methodist Church, 2569 Reynolda Rd, Winston-Salem NC. (map)

The topic on 6/17/2015 will be – Using LinkedIn during Career Transition.

LinkedIn as a Career Tranistion Tool

LinkedIn is an important tool during career transition and beyond. When you learn how to Present yourself, how to connect and how to engage on LinkedIn, you will have a significant advantage over your peers who are also in career transition. It takes time and lots of work, however, learning how to use LinkedIn during career transition will be very advantageous. Join us at CSN as we share ideas and best practices of using LinkedIn during career transition.

For information call (336) 283-6121 or email NCWiseman@TeddyBurriss.com

Here is a link to some useful Career Transition Books.

Do you know of other books that have helped you in your career transition?

Dream into your next Career Step

I originally published this article on LinkedIn. Read it here – Dream into your next Career Step

Boy pilotThe best way to discover your next career is to dream.

Most job seekers focus on their last job title and industry for that next career step. This is too limiting. Do not do this!

Instead let your mind go wild and start dreaming. Push yourself to dream beyond your most recent job title and industry. 

Dream about any thing:

  • you like to do
  • can do
  • can learn to do
  • want to do
  • wish you have done
  • want to do before you die
  • can imagine yourself doing
  • heard about
  • saw on TV
  • read about in a magazine
  • add to this list as you dream

A non-profit in Winston-Salem NC, Imagination Installations encourages us to use this model when dreaming, say “Imagine when…..” and complete the sentence with a positive statement of anything you want out of life.

As you dream do not allow barriers. Let me repeat this, “No barriers allowed.” Don’t consider:

  • income
  • location
  • what others may think
  • if you have the skills or experience
  • the industry
  • job title
  • big business or small business
  • public or private companies
  • working environment
  • Full time or part time

As you dream follow these critical guidelines:

  • Don’t disqualify anything. Dreaming should be without limits
  • Again, don’t consider income. This will cause you to disqualify ideas
  • Think about activities you enjoy. Dreaming should be a happy thing
  • Dream in quiet spaces. Distractions will misguide your dreams
  • Dreaming is not a short term process. Dream regularly & frequently
  • Journal your dreams. Let the list of revenue creation activities grow

This dreaming is not a one day thing. It could take weeks, maybe even a month. If you try to rush your dreaming you’ll reduce the benefits of dreaming. Take your time and let your imagination run free.

After you have dreamed long enough, sit back and look at your list of dreams. Consider each one and what they mean to you. Force yourself not to disqualify any dream. 

The last step of your dreaming is to prioritize the list. This prioritization is not about money, but instead the dream activities that you like the most. Work through the list using a scaled of 1-10. 10 being the activity you would pay to do, because you would enjoy it so much, and 1 being your least interesting activity. If you’ve dreamed hard enough you won’t have many 1s on your list.

Now that you have your list of dreams and you’ve prioritized them properly, hang on to the list.  The next big step of career transition, Open Conversations, will help you discover which of your dreams may be real possibilities.  I’ll share the process of having open conversations during job search in my next article.

Our Career Transition Program includes a phase of dreaming. If you want to learn more check out Burriss Consulting Career Transition Program

 

Allocating time for Job Search

Updated 3/6/14

clockAllocating time for Job Search

Job Search, like any other job, will be far more successful if you properly allocate your time to the tasks associated with the job.

Being hap hazard, random, inconsistent or un-focused with your time will not help you to be successful.

Here is a breakdown of high level activities associated with job search that if you follow will make you far more successful:

First of all, you have to invest a lot of time up front doing a review and deep dive analysis of “Who am I?” If you are not clear on who you are and what you want to do, you’re going to be unfocused and less successful.

You are not your last job title, industry or organization you worked for. You are bigger than that.

Spend time reviewing the activities you have done in your career and life. Try to qualify them as to what activities you enjoyed and were successful doing. It’s a big list and again, far deeper than your title.

Also, spend time talking with the people who know you. They may have some insight into this big question you have for yourself, “Who Am I?”

Get this question answered first so that you can create focus on what you wan to do.

Once you know who you are, have your initial Marketing material built, you can jump into the activities necessary to find that next great job or business opportunity.

How many hours a week to spend on Job Search activities

It’s your full time job, until you get another full time job. Treat it as you would treat any other full time job.

Here is a breakdown that I encourage you to use for this activity

Marketing Material Refinement – 5%

This activity is related to your resume, cover letter, LinkedIn Profile and any other online content. Once you know who you are this content should not change much at all. Maybe a few keyword tweaks, reorganization of content, a new recommendation or two. But generally speaking, your Marketing Material needs to support your focused goal.

Applying for Jobs – 5%

Far too many job seekers are investing far too much time applying for jobs. The reason they are wasting time doing this is because they either don’t know who they are or they are acting desperate. If you do the right things in your job search you will not waste time applying for jobs that are not you and that you are not totally convinced you should get.

Get over the feeling of success when you click apply and see that application go into the great ether of the job search world. It’s not helping you unless you “are that job” and have made some connections around and in the company you are applying to. (see below)

Professional & Personal Development – 5%  (added 3/6/14)

Regardless of whether we are the best at what we do and the best person we can be, we all have to constantly be improving and enhancing our skills.

Regular, even weekly learning is how we continue to thrive in life and our careers. It’s also how we find new ideas and skills that we can use to re-engineer ourselves for new career or business ideas.

Make sure that you are investing in your self, your career and your future by regularly learning.

Research – 30%

This is a critical part of your job search. Research creates knowledge, ideas, awareness, possible connections and organizations. Research lets you find companies who you have never heard of before who may have a need for your skills and expertise. Research helps you to develop new ideas of the types of work you could do and even positions you have either never considered or never heard of. Research is important in order for you to be different than all the other job seekers. Research gives you information about the companies, industries you are interested in. Research helps you to learn about company cultures, organizational changes, new companies in your region and people you need to connect with to keep your research growing (informational interviews).

Research is critical to your Job Search success. Get a library card and use their business research tools. Use LinkedIn and Twitter as research tools.

Failure often occurs because we do not have enough information. A job description and company website have only so much information. Look for way more and be better and different than all the other job seekers out there.

Networking – 55%

The most important thing you can do in your job search is to Network. Most experts in the career transition world tell us that 80%+ of all jobs happen through good networking.

Networking is where you get into conversations with the people you meet along your way.

Start with your front row, or inner circle, the people who already trust and respect you, maybe even love you. They may not know about a job opportunity, but likely they know someone else who may have ideas for you to consider, new people to meet. And, the cool thing about your front row or inner circle, they are likely to introduce you to other good people.

Networking is all about getting to know the person you are talking with. Ask opened ended questions, get to know them and get them to know you.

Networking is not about asking for a Job. – Repeat after me, “Networking is not about asking for a job”

You should never ask for something that you do not know exists. Instead, during the conversation as you get to know each other, once the conversation allows ask this question, “Who do you know that I should connect with?”

If you have done a good job of getting to know the person you are networking with and they have learned enough about you to trust and respect you (even if only a little bit), then they will be eager to share another one of their connections with you.

Read the book, “Networking for Mutual Benefit,” if you want to learn more about networking.

Summary

First spend time to determine “Who Am I,” and build your initial Marketing Material. This will take a lot of up front time.

Then slice your time up so that you are investing it in the most important and productive activities.

  • Marketing Material – 5%
  • Applying for Jobs – 5%
  • Personal Development – 5%
  • Research – 30%
  • Networking – 55%

Worry solves nothing

Worry solves nothing“Worry empties today of it’s joy.” unknown

Worry solves nothing

During any change in life, including the loss of a job, worry rears it’s ugly head and begins to chew away at your life.

It’s important to remember:

Worry solves nothing.

It steals your time, your energy, your desire, your ability to think logically and deliberately. Worry prohibits you from coming up with ideas, plans, solutions and activities that can actually solve a problem, regardless of what the problem is.

Worry solves nothing.

This quick little article is not intended to help you handle worry, but instead to get you to think about some ways you can handle worry. How can you put worry in it’s place, as far away from you as you can push it?

You can learn to handle worry, not make it go away, but handle it, by reading good books, listening to good seminars, praying, helping others, spending time with positive people and making decisions in advance, just to name a few ideas that you may be able to do.

You can learn to handle worry by focusing your energy, time, passion, thoughts, activities and words on positivity in everything you do, say, think, ponder and write.

Since worry solves nothing, I encourage you to find a way to handle worry. If you can come up with four or five deliberate and recurring methods of doing this on your own, here a few resources that I think may help:

Norman Vincent Peale – Power of Positive Thinking

Dale Carnegies book – How to deal with worry and start living

Read quotes about why worry is not good for you

Your Bible, Torah, Koran or other similar religious books

Visit good people in your Church, Synagogue, Temple, etc.

Listen to children playing on a playground, good music, a comedian, etc.

Again, I don’t want to pretend that the ideas I have for handling worry will work for you, we are all different people with different ideals, thought, resources and people in our lives.

However – I can only pray that you’ll find a way to help yourself deal with worry, because:

Worry Kills and Worry solves nothing.